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briangefrich:

huffingtonpost:

German Ad Doesn’t Need Words To Speak Volumes About Supporting Your Kids

Being a teenager is hard. But the German home improvement chain Hornbach knows having parents who go the extra mile to show their support can make a big difference.

Watch the full commercial that will sum those awkward high school years perfectly here. 

(Source: Hornbach

This is the kind of dad I want to be.

Reblogged from dearkelleycountmein  4,040 notes
areyoutryingtodeduceme:

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

Draco I love you so much you stupid like brat how old are you even here i don’t even know i am so tired

#oh dear sweet merlin yes #give me a draco covered in tattoos tho #give me gross rebel draco who becomes a weird kind of antihero #as an adult #gimme a draco who uses his family fortune to build orphanages #to give scholarships to kids coming from poor families #scholarships that go to muggleborns and purebloods alike #gimme draco who grows the fuck up and sees the error of his ways #give me a draco who tries to atone for his sins #who tries to hide his shame in a new kind of mask #no longer the cocky rich kid who’s better than you #now he’s the cocky punk just barely holding himself together #he nearly comes apart at the seams when he thinks too hard about his dark mark #but he knows if he gets it covered up #it’ll be seen as too much cowardice #i have too many feelings about draco malfoy and i need to stop (via manythingswillchange because these are basically all of my headcanons, never stop.)

If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also By
Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

IT’S BACK

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from dearkelleycountmein  1,624 notes
  • other kids writing their college essays:

    and that's how I learned that I am all about hardworking and doing what I am passionate about even if the pressure of grades, work, extracurriculars, and my social life (I have one, I swear) can be overwhelming sometimes.

  • me:

    I’m a goth (in case you couldn’t tell) and I wear mostly black. I love Hot Topic and I buy all my clothes from there. For example today I was wearing a black corset with matching lace around it and a black leather miniskirt, pink fishnets and black combat boots. I was wearing black lipstick, white foundation, black eyeliner and red eye shadow. I was walking outside Hogwarts. It was snowing and raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. A lot of preps stared at me. I put up my middle finger at them.

Reblogged from theblackskittle  32,895 notes

notallwugs:

Two scientists walk into a bar:

"I’ll have an H2O."

"I’ll have an H2O, too."

The bartender gives them both water because he is able to distinguish the boundary tones that dictate the grammatical function of homonyms in coda position as well as pragmatic context.

Reblogged from theblackskittle  291,112 notes
supersmashkev:

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

realmfighter:

oyezayn:

vladith:

Pakistani teenager Aitzaz Hasan died Monday after tackling a suicide bomber trying to enter his school. By sacrificing himself, he saved the lives of the 2,000 students studying inside. Hasan’s father says, ”My son made his mother cry, but saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children.”
This is bravery. This is selflessness. This is true courage.

Source


Here is a beautiful picture of his grave decorated with many flowers. May Allah rest his soul in peace…

rest in power my friend

supersmashkev:

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

realmfighter:

oyezayn:

vladith:

Pakistani teenager Aitzaz Hasan died Monday after tackling a suicide bomber trying to enter his school. By sacrificing himself, he saved the lives of the 2,000 students studying inside. Hasan’s father says, ”My son made his mother cry, but saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children.”

This is bravery. This is selflessness. This is true courage.

Source

Here is a beautiful picture of his grave decorated with many flowers. May Allah rest his soul in peace…

rest in power my friend